China Footprint: Smog forcing people to leave big cities?_China_Asia Pacific Daily

To download APD News app

1. Please scan the QR Code 2. Download and install APD News App

China Footprint: Smog forcing people to leave big cities?

China2017-09-13

Masks and air purifiers are two "musts" that most people in China's major cities have. From the latest report released by the Ministry of Environmental Protection, the air quality of cities in the north, especially those in Hebei Province, remain the worst around the whole country. China is under pressure this year to meet important air quality targets – to cut 2012 levels of PM2.5 by more than a quarter in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region and bring the average density of PM2.5 down to 60 micrograms per cubic meter in Beijing. With a diameter of less than 2.5 micrometers, PM2.5 is the particulate matter that causes hazardous smog. Yang Liu at her bee farm in a small town near Changbai Mountain in northeast China. Better life with family What's more likely happening in China is many young people choose to leave big cities and work in small places with a better environment. Yang Liu is one of them. She grew up in a small town near Changbai Mountain in northeast China. After living in big cities like Hangzhou and Dalian for a few years, she decided to move back home, looking for a cleaner environment for her family. "Though for my children, the educational resources in this small town can't be as good as in big cities, we still prefer to stay here," said Yang. She makes a living by making and selling honey, alongside her husband and parents. Their life is quiet and simple. Unlike many children in cities, her two children have never worn masks. Beautiful view of the Changbai Mountain area in northeast China. China committed to cutting emissions Air pollution remains one of the most important and urgent issues in China, especially in its capital. This summer, Beijing Environmental Protection Bureau inspected 96 private factories in its surrounding suburbs, finding 61 percent of them had illegal emissions – but only four were shut down. Many strict restrictions have been imposed to reduce emissions as well, mainly focusing on the use of coal and motor vehicles. Sales of electric cars in China have been growing rapidly, from less than 5,000 in 2011 to around 510,000 in 2016. China aims to hit the carbon emissions peak at around 2030, promising to make the best efforts to realize the target early, according to the country's intended nationally determined contributions (INDC) submitted to the Secretariat of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in 2015. The country has set the target to cut carbon dioxide emissions per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 60 percent to 65 percent from the 2005 level by 2030. Meanwhile, China's commitment to the Paris Climate Accord should lead to permanent carbon emissions reductions in the coming years. (CGTN)

Masks and air purifiers are two "musts" that most people in China's major cities have. From the latest report released by the Ministry of Environmental Protection, the air quality of cities in the north, especially those in Hebei Province, remain the worst around the whole country.

China is under pressure this year to meet important air quality targets – to cut 2012 levels of PM2.5 by more than a quarter in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region and bring the average density of PM2.5 down to 60 micrograms per cubic meter in Beijing.

With a diameter of less than 2.5 micrometers, PM2.5 is the particulate matter that causes hazardous smog.

Yang Liu at her bee farm in a small town near Changbai Mountain in northeast China.

Yang Liu at her bee farm in a small town near Changbai Mountain in northeast China.

Better life with family

What's more likely happening in China is many young people choose to leave big cities and work in small places with a better environment.

Yang Liu is one of them. She grew up in a small town near Changbai Mountain in northeast China. After living in big cities like Hangzhou and Dalian for a few years, she decided to move back home, looking for a cleaner environment for her family.

"Though for my children, the educational resources in this small town can't be as good as in big cities, we still prefer to stay here," said Yang.

She makes a living by making and selling honey, alongside her husband and parents. Their life is quiet and simple. Unlike many children in cities, her two children have never worn masks.

Beautiful view of the Changbai Mountain area in northeast China.

Beautiful view of the Changbai Mountain area in northeast China.

China committed to cutting emissions

Air pollution remains one of the most important and urgent issues in China, especially in its capital.

This summer, Beijing Environmental Protection Bureau inspected 96 private factories in its surrounding suburbs, finding 61 percent of them had illegal emissions – but only four were shut down.

Many strict restrictions have been imposed to reduce emissions as well, mainly focusing on the use of coal and motor vehicles.

Sales of electric cars in China have been growing rapidly, from less than 5,000 in 2011 to around 510,000 in 2016.

Sales of electric cars in China have been growing rapidly, from less than 5,000 in 2011 to around 510,000 in 2016.

China aims to hit the carbon emissions peak at around 2030, promising to make the best efforts to realize the target early, according to the country's intended nationally determined contributions (INDC) submitted to the Secretariat of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in 2015.

The country has set the target to cut carbon dioxide emissions per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 60 percent to 65 percent from the 2005 level by 2030.

Meanwhile, China's commitment to the Paris Climate Accord should lead to permanent carbon emissions reductions in the coming years.

(CGTN)

Hot Recommended

  • China: Grieving mother confronts murdered daughter's former roommate

  • China’s giant energy firm keen to expand cooperation with Indonesia

  • EU silence over Catalan leader's call for action speaks volumes

  • Pakistan:Honda criticized for blaming fuel quality for vehicle’s failure

  • China reaches agreement with WHO on fight against cancer

  • UK parliament rocked by mounting sleaze scandal